So many students have said, trans students have said; now I can have a point of reference when I talk about who I am. My friends are like, ‘Oh, like Sophia from ‘Orange is the New Black?’’ and they’re like, ‘yeah,’ and then they just move on and it’s not an issue,” she said. “I got a letter from a young, from a trans youth’s mother who said that he transitioned because of me and because of seeing me on the show it gave him the courage to talk to his parents about who he was and they’re supportive and loving and now he’s started his transition. It’s insane. It’s really beautiful.

Laverne Cox on the impact of her character Sophia Burset (via comebreakmedown-buryme)

REPRESENTATION MATTERS

(via thaxted)

Thax: 

(via cameronisagirlsnametoo)

She’s part of what helped me, too.

(via jadeneternal)

(via a-spoon-is-born)

molly-ren:

kylemistry:

More fun Quiet shots, this time from Colossalcon. All courtesy of the talented M1Photo, who you can find on Flickr or Facebook! The guy managed to make mid-day harsh sunlight work, and any photographer knows that’s no easy feat.

I have no idea what this is cosplay for but I like it.

(via femmeswithbeards)

milliardo:

when you say frozen wasnt that good white people be like

image

(via burdenedwithgloriousbooty)

thatfunnyblog:

this guy is systematically undoing the world

(via lana-thebanana)

daughterofzami:

redhester:

roslynholcomb:

daughterofzami:

On April 15, 2014, two College Park white male officers assaulted Mary Hooks. Mary Hooks is a mother, sister, friend, community organizer, and a lover of her people. She witnessed an aggressive and excessive police interaction between 4 officers with their guns drawn and 2 younger Black women pulled over behind her car at a gas station. Mary came their aid by asking the women if they knew their rights and if anyone needed to be contacted.When the two male officers approached Mary, she assured them she was standing back, she was only videotaping, and placed her hands up. These offices continue toward her, grabbed her and slammed her into the pavement, pushed her head into the ground with their knees, resulting in a scrab on her head and a fractured elbow.Subsequently, she was arrested, her truck was impounded, and she was charged with obstructing and public disorderly conduct. Both having fines and possible jail time.On behalf of Mary Hooks, community we are asking for your support to raise $3,500.00 cover her legal fees and fines. 
Please Share and Donate! 
www.gofundme.com/awkghg

Is there a link to a news story about this? I work in College Park and I’ve heard nothing about this incident. Suffice it to say, I’ve been around long enough to know if white cops beat up a black woman in Atlanta theres usually a helluva uproar. Not saying it didn’t happen, but I think if you’re going to have a campaign like this you should provide supporting evidence, just to make it clear. 

sister roslynholcomb, please unfollow me. thank you. 

roslynholcomb, No. There isn’t a news story because media outlets are rarely concerned with the abuse of Black women. State-sanctioned violence through the American terrorist police force against Black bodies isn’t considered to be news worthy. Excessive violence against Black women resulting in injury or death by White men in uniform is considered “protocol” or the “appropriate” use of force. News outlets assume such violence must be warranted or necessary. Maybe if she were a White woman, we could locate her story on the front page of the Atlanta Journal or a top story on CNN, but she is not White and we can NOT rely on a White-media to tell OUR stories. We should not need our stories to be validated by the news, our stories are made valid through our LIVED-EXPERIENCE. Because of a media that seeks to make the brutalities committed against Black women invisible, it is now the community’s responsibility to make sure that her story and the stories of others are told. It our responsibility to share this story. 

daughterofzami:

redhester:

roslynholcomb:

daughterofzami:

On April 15, 2014, two College Park white male officers assaulted Mary Hooks. Mary Hooks is a mother, sister, friend, community organizer, and a lover of her people. She witnessed an aggressive and excessive police interaction between 4 officers with their guns drawn and 2 younger Black women pulled over behind her car at a gas station. Mary came their aid by asking the women if they knew their rights and if anyone needed to be contacted.

When the two male officers approached Mary, she assured them she was standing back, she was only videotaping, and placed her hands up. These offices continue toward her, grabbed her and slammed her into the pavement, pushed her head into the ground with their knees, resulting in a scrab on her head and a fractured elbow.

Subsequently, she was arrested, her truck was impounded, and she was charged with obstructing and public disorderly conduct. Both having fines and possible jail time.

On behalf of Mary Hooks, community we are asking for your support to raise $3,500.00 cover her legal fees and fines. 

Please Share and Donate! 

www.gofundme.com/awkghg

Is there a link to a news story about this? I work in College Park and I’ve heard nothing about this incident. Suffice it to say, I’ve been around long enough to know if white cops beat up a black woman in Atlanta theres usually a helluva uproar. Not saying it didn’t happen, but I think if you’re going to have a campaign like this you should provide supporting evidence, just to make it clear. 

sister roslynholcomb, please unfollow me. thank you. 

roslynholcomb, No. There isn’t a news story because media outlets are rarely concerned with the abuse of Black women. State-sanctioned violence through the American terrorist police force against Black bodies isn’t considered to be news worthy. Excessive violence against Black women resulting in injury or death by White men in uniform is considered “protocol” or the “appropriate” use of force. News outlets assume such violence must be warranted or necessary. Maybe if she were a White woman, we could locate her story on the front page of the Atlanta Journal or a top story on CNN, but she is not White and we can NOT rely on a White-media to tell OUR stories. We should not need our stories to be validated by the news, our stories are made valid through our LIVED-EXPERIENCE. Because of a media that seeks to make the brutalities committed against Black women invisible, it is now the community’s responsibility to make sure that her story and the stories of others are told. 

It our responsibility to share this story. 

(via glitterlion)

The problem with metaphors like “I was blind and now I see” is they overwhelmingly position the disability as the negative. When you’re “blind to the consequences”, when your voice “falls on deaf ears”, when you need to “stand up for yourself”, those are all negative situations that should be rectified. In contrast, having your “eyes opened”, being “all ears” and “standing your ground” are situations that are generally applauded. Sadly, I never hear anybody being told to “sit their ground”. Disability is synonymous with lack of insight, inability to communicate and not having the power or the intelligence to have agency over your own life. Sound familiar? Those are all stereotypes that are associated with all kinds of disability. — “The Trouble with Ableist Metaphors" @ That Crazy Crippled Chick (via disabilityhistory)

(via burdenedwithgloriousbooty)

Also I helped customers at work like a normal person who didn’t apply to the 4 am shift in hopes of minimizing the number of people he has to talk to.
I was gonna tell you all how many but I lost track so assume in the ballpark of 10.
Basically I handled it by finding someone else more than half the times but eventually was asked things I could answer/do on my own and I did them.
I am quite proud of myself.